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Kayak fishing — a Long Island revolution

James Laino

 

June 26, 2008 | 05:31 AM
Along the shore, going down the river, gliding across the bay or plying the shallow marshes, a fishing revolution is taking place on the waters of Long Island. Here come the kayaks, and riding in or on top of them are fishermen of all stripes, from flyrodders to bait casters, from spin fishers to wily crabbers.Kayaks are rapidly becoming the craft of choice for those anglers who want the means to go where the fish are, unburdened by hauling boats, vessel upkeep, ramp and slip fees or the price of gasoline. Purchase a kayak, a paddle and a life jacket and you are set for a long stretch of fishing adventure.

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Personal Interest

Go tell the stories that I have told you

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Holocaust survivor and author recounts her childhood horrors and hopes at RPHS

By James Laino

May 10, 2007
“I now have a favor to ask each one of you,” Marion Blumenthal Lazan said, as she again turned her bright, piercing eyes on the students who filled each seat in the Rocky Point High School auditorium. They had just sat transfixed for 40 minutes as the Holocaust survivor relived for them the nightmare that was her life, trapped with her family in the Nazi concentration camp Bergen-Belsen.

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Essay

Duane Hanson on the Avenue of the Unreal

 

Heading for the Duane Hanson exhibit at the Whitney Museum of American Art, I found myself passing Madison Avenue’s shopping mall of the mega-rich.  A fifteen block long pageant of unreality, displaying the jarring contrasts which speak volumes about New York City’s unbridgeable chasm between privilege and poverty. Continue reading

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drug addiction, teenage substance abuse

Dangers of common chemicals Dewey sees inhalants as potential gateway to hard drugs



Dangers of common chemicals

Dewey sees inhalants as potential gateway to hard drugs

December 14, 2007 | 01:16 AM
Last year, alcohol was the only addictive drug to kill more high school aged kids than Butane from cigarette lighters, according to Stephen Dewey, senior scientist in the chemistry department at Brookhaven National Laboratory, who spoke to parents earlier this month at the Earl H. Vandermeulen High School in Port Jefferson. Continue reading
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vietnam

Stark tale of Vietnam …. Decorated Marine veteran Peter Addesso, who survived Hue, addresses students

Battle of Hamo Village During the Tet Offensiv...

English: Hue, Vietnam - The Citadel - Royal En...

English: Hue, Vietnam – The Citadel – Royal Enclosure – showing damage from the 1968 fighting between the US and Vietcong/North Vietnamese forces during the Tet Offensive. June 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

November 29, 2007
Vincent Calmone, a senior at Shoreham-Wading River High School, solemnly marked the beginning this year’s Veterans Day remembrance by playing Taps on his trumpet in the school’s auditorium. All in attendance silently faced the flag as the haunting melody was played to honor the tradition and memory of fallen Armed Service members, a fitting beginning to Lieutenant Peter Addesso’s presentation of his Vietnam experience.

Addesso is a Vietnam veteran, a Marine with the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, who was engaged in what was perhaps the bloodiest engagement of the Vietnam War, the Battle of Hue City. It was a fight so fierce that of the 312 Marines in his company who fought to gain a crucial portal in the allied attempt to retake control of Hue, only he and 15 others survived the six-week fight, which ended with the U.S., Australian and South Vietnamese troops retaking the battle-scarred city.

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Personal Interest

Hope House

Hope House

Under a plastic tarp among a stand of shrub oak trees somewhere in Mount Sinai, a raw faced weather-beaten man of 41, who looks much older, groggily rises to another day and steels himself for the ordeal that his life has become.  If he is lucky he will be able to scavenge together enough cash for some takeout food and a bottle of vodka.

A mother in Coram returns from a hard day’s work and suspects the battle will soon begin again. Her fears are well founded, as she finds her 15 year old son still sleeping at 3 PM.  Her child, anti-social and withdrawn has skipped school again and is very close to being expelled.

In Sound Beach a pregnant women lives and drinks alone in a basement apartment, two months behind on her rent.  The only calls she gets, aside from an increasingly angry landlord, are from her abusive ex-boyfriend. Continue reading

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